Reincarnation of Om Sety and the Secrets at Abydos

La_Abydos_1If you’ve ever been to Egypt and visited the Temple at Abydos, then you’ve heard of the amazing story of a woman whose memory of a former life helped 20th Century Archaeologists uncover lost Egyptian history. Her name was Dorothy Eady (later to be called “Om Sety”) and her story is perhaps the most famous reincarnation case ever heard.

I’ve been to Abydos, Egypt twice. It is by far the temple I most resonate with, being home to the Ancient Egyptian Mystery Schools—so it’s not surprising that her energy lives on there.

To tell Dorothy’s story accurately, it is best told in her own words…

“I was born in London, England in 1904, and was christened Dorothy Lousie Eady. My father was then a Master Tailor. Neither he nor my mother had any interest in Egypt, ancient or modern.

“When I was three years old, I fell down a long flight of stairs and was knocked unconscious. The doctor was called; he examined me thoroughly and pronounced me dead. About one hour later he returned with my death certificate and a nurse to ‘lay out the body,’ but to his astonishment, the ‘body’ was completely conscious, playing about, and showing no signs of anything amiss!

“Soon after this accident, I began to dream of a huge and lovely building (which later I found out was actually the Temple of Seti I at Abydos). On waking, I would cry bitterly and beg to be allowed to go home.  This longing to ‘go home’ became a joke in my family, and I was assured that I WAS at home, but I was equally sure I was not.

“When I was four years old I was taken to the British Museum in London as part of a family party. Mother said I paid no attention to anything until we reached the Egyptian Galleries. Then I went simply crazy, running about and kissing the feet of all the statues that I could reach. When the family was ready to leave, Mother said I clung to a glass case containing a mummy and screamed, ‘Leave me here, these are my people.’ She was so surprised that she never forgot the incident.

“When I was six years old I saw a picture of the Temple of Seti I at Abydos, in a magazine. I recognized it at once as the place I had always dreamed about, but was puzzled because the photo showed it to be somewhat ruined. I showed the picture to my father, told him that it was my home, and that I wanted to return there. Of course, he told me not to talk nonsense. He told me that it was an old temple in a country called Egypt, and that I had never been there in my life.

“When I started to go to school, I was bored to tears unless there was a lesson in which there was a reference to Egypt. So I got the bright idea of skipping school and going to the British Museum instead. Old Sir Ernest Budge, who was then Keeper of the Egyptian Collection, saw me nearly every mooning around the Egyptian Galleries, asked me why I did not go to school. I replied that the school did not teach me what I wanted to know. I wanted to learn hieroglyphics. So he offered to teach me, and he did…”

Dorothy Eady would continue to pursue her obsession with Egypt. She worked for an Egyptian interest magazine in London, where she met a young visiting Egyptian student. They married and she followed him back to his homeland of Egypt where they had a child she named “Sety.” As a married woman with a child, she acquired the respectful title “Om Sety” (meaning, mother of Sety, her first-born child).

The marriage lasted only two years and Dorothy was on her own. She went to work for the Egyptian Department of Antiquities working with well-known Egyptologist Professor Selim Hassan. When he retired she worked for the Pyramid Research Project at Dasher. During this time she would decipher and transcribe the hieroglyphics and point the archaeologists in places she thought they would find something significant. She was always right and no one knew how she knew. She quickly earned the respect of the male Egyptologists on dig expeditions who would agree that “if Dorothy says it’s there, then it’s there.”

But the more interesting part of Dorothy’s story, which Dorothy only revealed to Dr. Selim Hassan and a few chosen others, was that not only did she remember her previous life in Egypt, but at night she would be visited by the solid-appearing spirit of the Pharaoh Seti I. And more astoundingly, there were others that witnessed a tall kingly like figure standing at the foot of Dorothy’s bed at night. So who was Dorothy Eady in a past life to merit nightly visitations from the spirit of a famous, yet very dead, pharaoh?

Dorothy claims her name during Ancient times was ‘Bentreshyt’. She came from a poor peasant family who gave her in offering to the Temple at Abydos when she was a young child to be tutored in the ways of the priesthood. Abydos is in northern Upper Egypt and has been a sacred site to the Egyptians since predynastic times. Abydos is the cult center for Osiris, god of the dead.

In the temples of Abydos, an initiate’s training was a process that took many years, requiring many tests of moral strength, character, and service. Dorothy recalls, as Bentreshyt, spending many hours of quiet contemplation in a beautiful tree-filled garden at Abydos. One day the Pharaoh Seti, who built the Abydos Temple circa 1300 B.C.E., came to call. He saw the young initiate in the garden and struck up a conversation with her. Whenever he would visit the temple he would seek out Bentreshyt, and over time the two developed a close relationship.  Eventually, they became secret lovers, something forbidden to a temple initiate.

The inevitable happened and Bentreshyt became pregnant. When she was brought before the temple priests, she refused to reveal the name of the child’s father. She feared telling anyone it was her true love, the Pharaoh Seti.

Before Seti could learn of her pregnancy, Bentreshyt committed suicide to protect her secret. The next time Seti visited, he inquired about the whereabouts of his young love. He was informed she was gone and nothing else. Apparently, as the story goes, Seti grieved the sudden loss of Bentreshyt. He vowed to search to the ends of the earth to find her again. And Eady claims he visited her up until her death in 1981. It’s certainly a tragic, yet romantic, love story. But because of these nightly visitations in this life, she was able to fill in some important historical gaps about not only Seti I, but the life and times of this Ancient Egyptian period.

DSC_3063Om Sety (aka Dorothy Eady) went to Abydos for the first time, in this lifetime, in 1956 when the temple was under much-needed restoration. Her first visit to the temple was upon her arrival at night and no electrical lights were available. She told the guard on duty she didn’t need lights. She knew where everything was and then proceeded to give him a tour in the dark, pointing out every chamber, its name, as well as identifying each of the seven sacred chapels dedicated to a specific god. She even told him where the gardens used to be, which were no longer there. They didn’t believe her until they started digging up the area and found the tree roots just as she had described.

Om Sety would spend the remainder of her life as a caretaker of the temple, helping in the restoration process, giving dignitaries and archaeologists alike personal tours. No one knew the temple better than Om Sety. Yet, they say, she was always pressing the temple walls and stones, looking to open hidden chambers she said were once there.

The interesting thing about Om Sety’s life, which is not talked about in books such as Jonathan Cott’s,1454682_3771453381936_973764201_n1 “Search for Om Sety” or even in her own autobiography, “Om Sety’s Abydos,” is that her destiny had already been pre-set to some degree by the High Priests of Abydos who were expert seers unto the Temple of the Prophets.

The High Priests knew she would fall in love with the virile pharaoh and would have a child by him. They knew she would never become a full-fledged initiate into the priesthood. They also knew that she would eventually choose to take her own life, and that she would forever be drawn in future lifetimes to the temple where she experienced such a deep love.

The High Priests knew that on a soul level Bentreshyt had agreed to be the future caretaker of the Temple at Abydos—to honor both its heritage and its sacred secrets. In this respect, Om Sety appears to have made good her soul’s purpose and mission.

The Temple at Abydos, along with the Temples at Saqqara, were the primary homes of the great Mystery Schools of  Egypt. Seti I erected his own temple over an existing, even older temple, making it automatically a “sacred temple.” Each Pharaoh would aspire to have either a real tomb or a symbolic “fake” tomb built there for himself to insure his entrance into the afterlife. Why?

One reason might be hidden in plain sight. Atop a high temple beam at Abydos, which was discovered in the early 1900’s, is the infamous stone symbols of a helicopter,Hieroglif_z_Abydos submarine, and a spaceship. The futuristic symbols have often baffled Egyptologists. Some claim these strange symbols are the result of later pharaohs (after Seti I), carving over old symbols, as they sometimes did to put down their own name instead, thereby distorting the original image. But there is no evidence of this on the stone slab in question and the beam is so close to the ceiling, most people never even see it.

According to military aerospace historian and pilot, Michael Schratt, Abydos sits on a natural occurring Stargate portal, much like the Great Pyramid. He reports that the U.S. military used this portal in 2003 to send an ET visitor home. Perhaps this is the technology former Lockheed Skunkworks Director, Ben Rich, was referring to when he said over 15 years ago that “we now have the technology to bring ET home.”

Did the pharaohs all know about this natural portal? Ramses II built a temple 300 yards northwest from his father Seti I’s temple at Abydos. No one knows why it is mysteriously referred to as the “Portal Temple.” More recently, “Abydos” is referenced in the 1994 “Stargate” movie and even in video games of the same nature. Is it any wonder the Ancients considered Abydos the most sacred temple in all of Egypt? The interest never seems to wane regarding Ancient Stargates and portals. Fimmakers are now in production to do a remake of the Stargate movie, in trilogy form.

This particular Stargate portal was protected by the Mystery School Priests of Egypt, long before Seti I built his temple at Abydos. This portal provided time travel capabilities and knowledge of the future, which might explain the mysterious futuristic aircraft symbols seen on the ceiling wall beam. Using this portal technology is how the High Priests verified the future destiny of the reincarnated initiate who would one day become famous as “Om Sety,” and also why Pharaohs built their tombs at Abydos to insure their entrance to the stars after death.

about_osIt is interesting to note that cosmologists have pointed out that the many temple drawings of Egyptian boats, always seen as carrier vehicles to the heavenly stars, have the odd shape of what today’s scientists say look exactly like wormholes in space. They have trumpet-like openings at each end and hardly look like sea-worthy vehicles. Did they represent portal streams to the universe?space_wormhole500

These depictions on the walls of Abydos and other Egyptian temples is always linked to the astrological stars and the quest for the “after” world. Perhaps, what they really were trying to show us was the pathway to an “other” world in time and space.

DSC04020The Abydos Stargate is part of the Osirion, a building that pre-dates Seti I’s temple. For centuries the Osirion was buried under layers of sand, protecting its secrets. It’s still partly underground and now flooded with green water. There is an unusual double laser-infused “Flower of Life” pattern on one of the granite walls. It’s not carved or burned into the stone—it’s lasered on, telling us it was done by advanced tools. This is the oldest example of sacred geometry found anywhere, to-date. Other examples can be found in Phoenician, Assyrian, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, and medieval art, but not laser stone cut.

The Flower of Life is the symbol said to contain the blueprint of creation and the fundamental forms of spacefloweroflife and time. It is the visual expression of the connections of life that runs through all sentient beings. The adepts of the Mystery Schools of Egypt knew and understood these universal truths. We are only now beginning to rediscover them again.

We may even discover that many of the sacred temples around the world, often said to be built on energetic Earth ley lines, may actually hide other portals into space and time that the ancients knew about. I guess it’s only a matter of time, but what an exciting time it’s bound to be.

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Dr. Kathy Forti is a clinical psychologist, inventor of the Trinfinity8 technology, and author of the book, Fractals of God

 

4 replies
  1. Peter Kelly
    Peter Kelly says:

    Another interesting article Kathy. I am intrigued by all this ancient Egyptian history. I also notice an interesting facial image in the lower right side of Dorothy’s pink sweater. Could it be the face of Pharaoh Seti?

    Reply
  2. Pippa
    Pippa says:

    Absolutely fascinating and beautifully written, Kathy. Thank you SO much for sharing this. I’ve always been interested in Egyptology and wish I could have journeyed with you. Love and light, Pippa

    Reply
  3. John Shaner
    John Shaner says:

    I don’t know about you but I see in the picture of the woman a double exposure of the wall behind her. Also there’s a shadow of a person or someone next to her. On her right side there’s a dark image of a pharaoh or someone , what going on in that picture? Unbelievable!

    Reply

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